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Here are 17 plant foods that contain a high amount of protein per serving.



1. Seitan It’s made from gluten, the main protein in wheat. Also known as wheat meat or whet gluten, it contains about 25 grams of protein per 3.5 ounces (100 grams). Seitan is also a good source of selenium and contains small amounts of iron, calcium and phosphorus Seitan can be pan-fried, sautéed and even grilled. Therefore, it can be easily incorporated in a variety of recipes. However, seitan should be avoided by people with celiac disease or gluten sensitivity.





2. Tofu, tempeh and edamame all originate from soybeans. Soybeans are considered a whole source of protein. This means that they provide the body with all the essential amino acids it needs. All three contain iron, calcium and 10-19 grams of protein per 3.5 ounces (100 grams) Edamame are also rich in folate, vitamin K and fiber. Tempeh contains a good amount of probiotics, B vitamins and minerals such as magnesium and phosphorus.




3. Lentils At 18 grams of protein per cooked cup (240 ml), lentils are a great source of protein Lentils also contain good amounts of slowly digested carbs, and a single cup (240 ml) provides approximately 50% of your recommended daily fiber intake. Lentils may also help reduce the risk of heart disease, diabetes, excess body weight and some types of cancer . In addition, lentils are rich in folate, manganese and iron. They also contain a good amount of antioxidants and other health-promoting plant compounds




4. Chickpeas and Most Varieties of Beans Kidney, black, pinto and most other varieties of beans contain high amounts of protein per serving. Chickpeas, also known as garbanzo beans, are another legume with a high protein content. Both beans and chickpeas contain about 15 grams of protein per cooked cup (240 ml). They are also excellent sources of complex carbs, fiber, iron, folate, phosphorus, potassium, manganese and several beneficial plant compounds




5. Nutritional yeast is a deactivated strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast, sold commercially as a yellow powder or flakes.This complete source of plant protein provides the body with 14 grams of protein and 7 grams of fiber per ounce (28 grams) . Fortified nutritional yeast is also an excellent source of zinc, magnesium, copper, manganese and all the B vitamins, including B12.




6. Spelt and Teff Spelt and teff belong to a category known as ancient grains. Other ancient grains include einkorn, barley, sorghum and farro. Spelt is a type of wheat and contains gluten, whereas teff originates from an annual grass, which means it’s gluten-free. Spelt and teff provide 10–11 grams of protein per cooked cup (240 ml), making them higher in protein than other ancient grains




7. Green Peas often served as a side dish contain 9 grams of protein per cooked cup (240 ml), which is slightly more than a cup of milk What’s more, a serving of green peas covers more than 25% of your daily fiber, vitamin A, C, K, thiamine, folate and manganese requirements. Green peas are also a good source of iron, magnesium, phosphorus, zinc, copper and several other B vitamins




9. Spirulina Two tablespoons (30 ml) provide you with 8 grams of complete protein, in addition to covering 22% of your daily requirements of iron and thiamin and 42% of your daily copper needs (33).




Spirulina also contains decent amounts of magnesium, riboflavin, manganese, potassium and small amounts of most of the other nutrients your body needs, including essential fatty acids.




10. Amaranth and Quinoa



Although often referred to as ancient or gluten-free grains, amaranth and quinoa don’t grow from grasses like other cereal grains do.


Amaranth and quinoa provide 8–9 grams of protein per cooked cup (240 ml) and are complete sources of protein, which is rare among grains and pseudocereals.



Also, amaranth and quinoa are good sources of complex carbs, fiber, iron, manganese, phosphorus and magnesium.




11. Ezekiel Bread and Other Breads Made From Sprouted Grains


Two slices of Ezekiel bread contain approximately 8 grams of protein, which is slightly more than the average bread .


Sprouting grains and legumes increases the amount of healthy nutrients they contain and reduces the amount of anti-nutrients in them.


Sprouting also seems to increase the bread’s soluble fiber, folate, vitamin C, vitamin E and beta-carotene content. It may also slightly reduce the gluten content, which can enhance digestion in those sensitive to gluten.




12. Soy Milk



Not only does it contain 7 grams of protein per cup (240 ml), but it’s also an excellent source of calcium, vitamin D and vitamin B12 (50).


However, keep in mind that soy milk and soybeans do not naturally contain vitamin B12, so picking a fortified variety is recommended.





13. Oats and Oatmeal Oats are an easy and delicious way to add protein to any diet.


Half a cup (120 ml) of dry oats provides you with approximately 6 grams of protein and 4 grams of fiber. This portion also contains good amounts of magnesium, zinc, phosphorus and folate (51).





Although oats are not considered a complete protein, they do contain higher-quality protein than other commonly consumed grains like rice and wheat.


You can use oats in a variety of recipes ranging from oatmeal to veggie burgers. They can also be ground into flour and used for baking.



Bottom Line: Oats are not only nutritious but also an easy and delicious way to incorporate plant protein into a vegan or vegetarian diet.




14. Wild Rice



Wild rice contains approximately 1.5 times as much protein as other long-grain rice varieties, including brown rice and basmati.


One cooked cup (240 ml) provides 7 grams of protein, in addition to a good amount of fiber, manganese, magnesium, copper, phosphorus and B vitamins.


Unlike white rice, wild rice is not stripped of its bran. This is great from a nutritional perspective, as bran contains fiber and plenty of vitamins and minerals .


However, this causes concerns about arsenic, which can accumulate in the bran of rice crops grown in polluted areas.


Arsenic is a toxic trace element that may give rise to various health problems, especially when ingested regularly for long periods of time.


Washing wild rice before cooking and using plenty of water to boil it may reduce the arsenic content by up to 57%.



Bottom Line: Wild rice is a tasty, nutrient-rich plant source of protein. Those relying on wild rice as a food staple should take precautions to reduce its arsenic content.



15. Chia Seeds Chia seeds are derived from the Salvia hispanica plant, which is native to Mexico and Guatemala.


At 6 grams of protein and 13 grams of fiber per 1.25 ounces (35 grams), chia seeds definitely deserve their spot on this list.


What’s more, these little seeds contain a good amount of iron, calcium, selenium and magnesium, as well as omega-3 fatty acids, antioxidants and various other beneficial plant compounds .


They’re also incredibly versatile. Chia seeds have a bland taste and are able to absorb water, turning into a gel-like substance. This makes them an easy addition to a variety of recipes, ranging from smoothies to baked goods and chia puddings.



Bottom Line: Chia seeds are a versatile source of plant protein. They also contain a variety of vitamins, minerals, antioxidants and other health-promoting compounds.




16. Nuts, Nut Butters and Other Seeds Nuts, seeds and their derived products are great sources of protein.


One ounce (28 grams) contains between 5–7 grams of protein, depending on the nut and seed variety.


Nuts and seeds are also great sources of fiber and healthy fats, in addition to iron, calcium, magnesium, selenium, phosphorus, vitamin E and certain B vitamins. They also contain antioxidants, among other beneficial plant compounds .


When choosing which nuts and seeds to buy, keep in mind that blanching and roasting may damage the nutrients in nuts. So reach for raw, unblanched versions whenever possible


Also, try opting for natural nut butters to avoid the oil, sugar and excess salt often added to many household brand varieties.



Bottom Line: Nuts, seeds and their butters are an easy way to add plant protein, vitamins and minerals to your diet. Opt to consume them raw, unblanched and with no other additives to maximize their nutrient content.




17. Protein-Rich Fruits and Vegetables A Pile of Spinach Leaves. All fruits and vegetables contain protein, but the amounts are usually small.


However, some contain more than others.


Vegetables with the most protein include broccoli, spinach, asparagus, artichokes, potatoes, sweet potatoes and Brussels sprouts.


They contain about 4–5 grams of protein per cooked cup.


Although technically a grain, sweet corn is a common food that contains about as much protein as these high-protein vegetables .


Fresh fruits generally have a lower protein content than vegetables. Those containing the most include include guava, cherimoyas, mulberries, blackberries, nectarines and bananas, which have about 2–4 grams of protein per cup.



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